Importance Of Religion In Rebates Trade

“In God We Trust”: Americans’ belief in God can be read on every dollar bill. Every second person visits a house of prayer at least once a week. rebatesReligion is an important part of public life in the USA. It shaped the identity of society and held the growing nation together with its immigrants from all over the world. Even in rebates business, religion has an influence.

When you start a trip in the USA, for example in New York, Los Angeles, Miami or Las Vegas, religion does not seem to play a role in public life at first glance. They use TV channels for advertising and the “Star-Spangled Banner” flutters above everything. In this country patriotism, consumption and money seem to be the priorities, religion on the other hand to play a subordinate role. But if you pay for your first coffee and take a closer look at the dollar bills, you will discover the motto “In God We Trust” on the back.

Rebates: Religion as part of US identity

A firm belief has shaped the lives of Americans since the founding of the United States in the 18th century. Many of the first settlers had fled their European home countries because they had been persecuted there because of their religion. That shouldn’t be repeated. According to the Bill of Rights 1789, one’s own religion must be able to be practised in the USA under all circumstances without interference from the state. The state has to stay out of religion. There must be no state-controlled churches. But belief was not a purely private matter. It shaped the identity of American society and businesses.

Rebates: Belief matters, not direction

The main thing is that you believe, no matter which church you belong to. Because of this creed, no single denomination could prevail in the USA. No US government has ever dared to defy the constitution and found a state church. There is also no religious umbrella organization; the religious scene is fragmented. Over half of Americans are Protestants. But they are spread over many different church communities. There are Baptists, Methodists, Lutherans, among others. None of these churches unites more than ten percent of Protestants.

Almost like in the market economy, the churches compete for believers, since no church taxes are levied and they have to live on donations. New churches are constantly emerging.

Categories: Religion

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