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It will always be attached with religion the amazing architecture and engineering marvel on how houses of worship were built.

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TV Depiction of Religion and Diversity

Watching Netflix

 

In the last number of decades, there’s been a positive increase within the degree of diversity seen on screen, whether it’s in British classics like Doctor Who or American hits like Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Now, quite ever, ethnic, gender, and sexual minorities are finding a voice on the little screen, where they’d previously struggled to maneuver beyond stereotypes. This doesn’t mean such stereotypes and prejudices don’t endure, but if you remember at the most IPTV shows from long ago, you’re significantly more likely to seek out shows dominated by straight, white men, perhaps with a pair of ladies and also the occasional non-white character within the supporting cast.

Yet, during this article, I would like to speak about the depiction of nonsecular characters on screen, since I feel that, to an extent, these are getting a minority that’s experiencing a case of stereotyping and conspicuous absence that several other groups have experienced within the past. Certainly, religion isn’t absent from TV altogether, and a few might even want to assert that its side-lining is simply an accurate representation of contemporary Western society, yet I’d beg to differ that depictions of faith are anything but representative.

To [Brooklyn Nine-Nine]’s a diverse cast, a religious character would add further variety

just because it’s so celebrated for its diversity, The first example I might prefer to draw from is Brooklyn Nine-Nine. The show does an incredible job accommodating its diverse characters with varied and thoroughly entertaining storylines which, indeed, makes me like this show lot. But it’s precisely for this reason that the absence of faith within the show stands out all the more. None of the cast holds religious views, despite the US continues to be a highly religious country. Yet, a spiritual character would add further variety to the show’s diverse cast, providing a contrast to the unanimously sexually active characters and a worldview that’s not otherwise depicted within the show.

The probable reason why I feel even better justified to appear at religion in British TV is that the USA, however, does have a rather different religious landscape to our own country. Particularly, I used to be drawn to contemplate its depiction when watching Fresh Meat, a show about British university life and thus a few contexts on which I’m certainly qualified to comment. One of the items I actually liked about the show was the mismatch of personalities and backgrounds of the most cast since it felt like such an accurate depiction of the university. However, once again, there was an absence of any voice for a spiritual character.

 

ALSO READ: Should Christians Play Video Games?

 

We are regularly being shown an atheist’s stereotyped idea of nonsecular believers

Perhaps this wouldn’t are so bad if it weren’t for the dreadfully stereotyped depictions of faith that did exist on the number of occasions when ‘the Christian Union’ was mentioned. Within the first, Kingsley is seduced by a woman who takes him home as if to possess sex, only to then try to convert him to Christianity, while within second Oregon advises Candice to avoid the Christian Union on the premise that they’re a cult. Considering these are the sole mentions of faith across all four series, I can’t help but feel they’re colored by one person’s negative view of Christianity, since it’s off from representative of the actual fact that religious people on campus may be and usually are normal people the maximum amount as anyone.

And these don’t seem to be isolated examples. I also wrote last year about the shallow dig at religion that was seen in Humans and within the recent past, we’ve had two separate articles about the dubious TV depiction of Muslims. The foundation of the difficulty in most of those examples is evident to see: we are regularly being shown an atheist’s stereotyped idea of nonsecular believers, instead of hearing what it really means to be religious. And this can be something that we’ve seen before: whether it’s a white man’s idea of a Black, a straight man’s idea of a shirt lifter, or a man’s idea of a lady.

 

Categories: Religion